Tag Archives: hg

Meld in TortoiseHg

I like Meld as a visual diff/merge tool. You can also use it as the default in TortoiseHg. Open TortoiseHg’s Workbench. Go to File » Settings, make sure the global settings tab is active. Click Edit File, if it doesn’t yet exist create a section called [extdiff], and under [extdiff] add cmd.meld = /path/to/meld. For Windows it would be something like cmd.meld = C:\Program Files (x86)\Meld\meld.exe. From the command line you should be able to use hg meld to get your diff shown in Meld.

Mercurial, python keyring 3, and mercurial keyring

In an earlier post I documented how to set up an encrypted file store for your keyring. With recent versions of Python keyring (at least 3 and up) the CryptedFileKeyring backend got removed and replaced by EncryptedKeyring. So in your $HOME/.local/share/python_keyring/keyringrc.cfg you need to now have the following:

[backend]
default-keyring=keyring.backends.file.EncryptedKeyring

PyCharm, Mercurial and keyrings

If PyCharm complains that it Can't start Mercurial: /usr/bin/hg Probably the path to hg executable is not valid, then check if running hg from the command line triggers a problem running a certain extension. In my case I had a version of keyring and mercurial_keyring that did not play nice with each other. After upgrading these to 3.0.5 and 0.6.0 respectively, the problem went away. I guess PyCharm tests the run of the hg binary and if the shell return code (echo $?) is something other than 0 will show this warning.

Mercurial and safely storing passwords

Mercurial allows for tying in keyring configuration for those of us who do not want to store passwords in plain-text in our .hgrc files or constantly using SSH.

First install the Python keyring library by running pip install keyring. After that is installed, checkout https://bitbucket.org/Mekk/mercurial_keyring/ and add to $HOME/.hgrc the following:

[extensions]
mercurial_keyring = ~/path/to/mercurial_keyring/mercurial_keyring.py

Next up, configure your repositories, e.g. in the case of Bitbucket I use:

[auth]
bitbucket.prefix = bitbucket.org/asmodai
bitbucket.username = asmodai
bitbucket.schemes = https

Mercurial keyring will automatically decide on the best keyring to use. On a FreeBSD system with no Gnome or other systems providing a keyring, if you do not specify a specific keyring, the system will use the file ~/.local/share/python_keyring/keyring_pass.cfg. This keyring file stores the passwords encoded in Base64 in plain-text. This is not quite what you would want from a security point of view. You can configure which backend store to use by editing $HOME/.local/share/python-keyring/keyringrc.cfg. To get a plain-text file with encrypted keys use the following configuration:

[backend]
default-keyring=keyring.backend.CryptedFileKeyring

This will create the file ~/.local/share/python-keyring/crypted_pass.cfg after initializing the backend store with a password. Look at the documentation for keyring on what other configuration options are available.

Note: make sure the PyCrypto dependency is installed with the _fastmath module. This in turn depends on the gmp library.