Science Fiction and Space Battles

Something I never understand between various science fiction movies and series is the difference in how space battles are conducted. Take for example Star Trek, you see all kinds of ships in fights, but contrast this to Battlestar Galactica, Space: Above and Beyond or Star Wars and there’s one striking difference: the absence of fighter and bomber ships fighting alongside capital ships. In Star Trek you will see, for example, the Enterprise in direct battle with various other ships, but aside from some shuttles they have no fighter ships or otherwise. In Star Wars next to the Imperial Star Destroyers, Corellian Corvettes and Dreadnaughts, Mon Calamari cruisers, and Nebulon-B frigates you have a multitude of TIE fighters, TIE interceptors, TIE bombers, X-Wings, Y-Wings, A-Wings, B-Wings, and YT-1300 like the Millennium Falcon. Battlestar Galactica had its Vipers and other ships. I wonder what this, in my opinion, fundamental difference signifies and where it comes from.

Fear is the mind-killer

This quote from Frank Herbert’s Dune is a litany against fear from the Bene Gesserit. I find the litany quite a good way to deal with the unexpected things in life. People so easily succumb to fear, whereas the human mind can conquer a lot of issues encountered in life and the universe.

“I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past, I will turn the inner eye to see it’s path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain.”

Coriolis winds blowing over Dune….

I reread Frank Herbert’s Dune recently. Things are so much clearer once you know more about Islam and the Qu’ran and some of the rituals there as well as Zen Buddhism and other topics such as Christianity and the Kaballah.
Magnificent book to be honest, he manages to drag you into the story and totally washes over you with a imaginary, yet possible future of mankind.

Dune Messiah is a most bizarre follow-up tale. Hard to describe what you read in those meager 200 pages, but they nonetheless make a tremendous impact. Amazing, just amazing.

The Butlerian Jihad was quite an interesting read by Brian Herbert, Frank’s son, to learn about the events that lead to the extermination of the thinking machines, the rise of the sorceresses, the Tleilaxu, Zensunnis and Zenshi’ites.

Now reading Dan Brown’s The Da Vinci Code.

Butterflies & Hurricanes

Well, thankfully it is a weekend again. I find I need more and more time to get back on energetic levels. Guess getting up every morning at 06:30 is asking a bit too much of my body. Darn that glandular fever (Pfeiffer) that I once suffered from. It never leaves your body.

Oh well, at least the good news is that I found out the appartment I was interested in, about two-three weeks ago, in Schiedam is now available again. Guess the financial stuff didn’t work out for the people who intended to buy it. Going to see it on monday. Yay!

Bought a bunch of books, amongst which: Classics of Buddhism and Zen – Volume One, Linkers and Loaders, Optimizing Compilers for Modern Architectures, Engineering a Compiler, C.S. Lewis’ first two Narnia books (The Magician’s Nephew and The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe), Frank Herbert’s Dune (wanted to reread it again), Oliver Twist, Moby Dick, Poe’s Spirits of the Dead, Michael Moore’s Stupid White Men and Dude Where’s my Country?, and Asimov’s I, Robot and Caves of Steel.

Been coding a lot lately. Expanded the r9 bot with some modules for RDF fetching, bugzilla bug fetching. Next is notifications.